Tag Archives: tangles

New Alzheimer’s Study Sheds Light on the Mysterious Tau Protein

If you’re a regular reader of AlzScience, you know that Alzheimer’s disease is believe to be caused by two toxic proteins that accumulate in the brain: amyloid-beta and tau. (For more background, see Alzheimer’s Disease: A General Overview.) Recently, it’s been shown that tau is actually a better predictor of Alzheimer’s disease progression than amyloid-beta, suggesting that this mysterious protein might have a larger role in the disease than we once thought.

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Amyloid-beta plaques and tau tangles form toxic clumps in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. Source

A study published last week in Nature provided deeper insight into tau. The scientists were interested in studying the ApoE gene, which is considered the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s (see The Genetics of Alzheimer’s Disease.) Specifically, having two copies of the ApoE4 allele increases your risk of Alzheimer’s by nearly 15 times, and it’s been shown that people with this allele have greater buildup of amyloid-beta in their brains. However, the researchers in this study wanted to see whether ApoE could also affect tau accumulation.

To test this, they used genetically engineered mice that overexpress the tau gene, causing them to develop many of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s. They then tampered with these mice’s genes so that they would also overexpress ApoE4. (Note: Overexpressing the tau and ApoE4 genes means those genes were more active than they normally would be in the mice. Think of it like a light switch stuck in the “on” position.) They found that these mice had more tau in their brains, and also more severe brain shrinkage due to neuronal death.

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This figure from the paper shows brain slices from different mice. The far left panel shows a healthy mouse brain. The next two (representing the ApoE2 and ApoE3 alleles) have slightly more brain atrophy, while the harmful ApoE4 allele causes very severe atrophy. In contrast, the far right brain, which does not express ApoE at all, has relatively little atrophy.

To figure out how ApoE4 might be causing more tau accumulation, the researchers looked at the mice’s microglia, the immune cells of the brain. The microglia overexpressing ApoE4 tended to overreact to infections, releasing high amounts of pro-inflammatory molecules called cytokines. Neurons and other brains cells are very sensitive to cytokines, and high levels might cause them to produce more tau.

Finally, the researchers turned to human research. They used postmortem brain tissues taken from people who had tauopathies, which are diseases caused by accumulation of tau (but not amyloid-beta) in the brain.  The people possessing the ApoE4 allele had more severe neurodegeneration and greater tau buildup in certain areas of the brain.

Overall, this study demonstrates that ApoE4 does not only act on amyloid-beta, but tau as well. It gives strong support to the notion that tau may be as important as amyloid-beta in understanding the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease. In an interview with Science News, Harvard neurologist Dennis Selkoe described this deadly combination of amyloid-beta and tau as a “double whammy.” Yet this study provides hope that future therapies against ApoE4 could be capable of halting both of these toxic proteins at once.

 

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Breakthrough in Alzheimer’s Research: What We Thought About Tau Tangles May Be All Wrong

The main hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is the accumulation of toxic protein species in the brain. These toxic deposits include senile plaques (made of the amyloid-beta protein) and neurofibrillary tangles (made of the tau protein). In general, recent drug development research for Alzheimer’s has focused on targeting amyloid-beta. This is because previous research suggested that amyloid-beta is responsible for initiating a set of chemical reactions that lead to the phosphorylation of tau. This p-tau (phosphorylated tau) is then more prone to sticking to itself and forming tangles. Thus, the thinking was that if we could get rid of amyloid-beta, tau would no longer form tangles, allowing us to eliminate both toxic proteins at once.

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Plaques and tangles in a normal and Alzheimer’s disease brain.

However, a study published this week in the journal Science may completely change how we think about amyloid-beta and tau. Researchers from Australia looked at enzymes of the p35 family, which are believed to mediate amyloid-beta’s ability to initiate p-tau formation. They focused on a member of this protein family called p35-delta (p35D), after determining that it was the only p35 protein that localized to synapses (the communication junctions between neurons.)

The exciting part of this study came when the researchers generated Alzheimer’s mice that lacked the gene for p35D. These mice experienced exacerbated symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, including worsened excitotoxicity, memory loss, and premature death. The researchers determined experimentally that these worsened symptoms were dependent on p35D’s ability to create p-tau. In other words, it seems that the presence of p35D (and in turn, the presence of p-tau) was actually protecting the mice from more severe symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

This study is big news in the field of neuroscience because it suggests that the formation of tangles by the p-tau protein may be helpful rather than harmful. Whereas in the past scientists have viewed tangles as a harmful side effect of amyloid-beta plaques, these new results indicate that p-tau may actually be a beneficial reaction to the plaques which keeps their toxicity in check. This is consistent with additional data from the study showing that humans with Alzheimer’s disease have reduced expression of p35D. The authors of the paper suggested that a decline in p35D expression, and in turn a decline in p-tau levels, may be a major contributor to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s researchers around the world are very excited about this paper and the ramifications it could have for future studies. Where previously we had been trying to deplete toxic p-tau, this strategy may actually worsen the disease. Rather, perhaps we should be trying to increase levels of p35D and/or p-tau in early Alzheimer’s patients in order to prevent disease progression. It’s possible that this study may also help explain why approximately 1 in 5 elderly adults contain the signature pathology of Alzheimer’s in their brains and yet do not experience any cognitive deficits. Perhaps these individuals benefit from higher expression of p35D which helps fight of the toxicity of amyloid-beta. Future studies will investigate whether this is indeed the case.

As always, we must interpret these results with caution. Since this study was based in mice, a lot of additional research will be needed to determine whether similar neurochemical pathways occur in humans and, if so, whether these can be utilized to design a preventative treatment for Alzheimer’s. Only time can tell how far-reaching the impacts of this study will be.

 

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