Macular Degeneration: Alzheimer’s Disease of the Eye?

Macular degeneration affects more than 10 million Americans, making it the leading cause of vision loss. It occurs when, for reasons that aren’t entirely understood, the central region of the retina (known as the “macula”) begins to deteriorate. The disease is considered incurable and usually occurs in people over the age of 55. Smokers and individuals of Caucasian decent are at an increased risk, as well as anyone with a family history of the disease.

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This animation from the American Macular Degeneration Foundation shows the loss of central vision that occurs with this disease.

Surprisingly, there are many parallels between macular degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease. Though the two conditions may seem unrelated, both are believed to be caused by the buildup of a toxic protein called amyloid-beta. In Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid-beta plaques accumulate in the brain, while in macular degeneration, amyloid-beta forms fatty deposits behind the retina called “drusen.” Plaques and drusen appear to have similar composition of proteins and fats, and utilize the same mechanisms to damage surrounding tissue.

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Diagram of a normal eye and an eye with macular degeneration. Image Source

The similarities between these two diseases don’t end there. Older people with macular degeneration are three times as likely to have cognitive impairment, suggesting that the same processes leading to amyloid-beta accumulation in the retina could also be occurring in the brain. This makes sense, since the retina and the brain are both part of the central nervous system. Additionally, several mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease exhibit amyloid-beta buildup in both the brain and the retina, further cementing the link between the two conditions.

The emerging connection between Alzheimer’s and macular degeneration has several important consequences. If amyloid-beta buildup in the retina could be a sign of a similar process happening in the brain, it raises the possibility that eye exams could serve as a non-invasive method to screen people for Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical trials for this idea are still ongoing, but the early results seem encouraging. These eye exams could potentially allow for earlier Alzheimer’s diagnosis or a lower risk of misdiagnosis.

This relationship also suggests that people with Alzheimer’s disease could be at a greater risk of macular degeneration, or vice versa. If you or a loved one is experiencing dementia, it’s recommended to minimize the risk of macular degeneration by receiving regular eye exams, protecting the eyes from sunlight, and maintaining a healthy diet.

 

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2 thoughts on “Macular Degeneration: Alzheimer’s Disease of the Eye?

  1. Alice Gosztyla

    Well, this is somewhat depressing, but also interesting, as I have Macular Degeneration. However, I am glad that my regular eye exams may be a proactive way of checking on both diseases. Thanks Maya

    Like

    Reply

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